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Monthly Archives: May 2018

Teach Kids about Home Security

Educate about when to answer the door:

If your descendants are alone and the need to answer the door, they should know that they have to look through the peephole first to see if it is a known face or not. And, if it is an unknown face, then they should answer through the intercom or open the door with the door chain latched. Also, while communicating with the stranger, children should inform that their parents are in the neighborhood or have gone to some nearby market and will be back in a few minutes, thus, requesting the person to come again later.

Train them how to answer the calls:

When you are away and your little darlings receive a call, they should be edified not to give their details on the phone rather, ask for the name of the person on the other side and take down the message. Also, they shouldn’t let the fact get conveyed to the other person that they are alone at home. Instead, they can portray that their elders are occupied with some important work and will get back to them soon.

Display Good Behavior:

Do things that you want your kids to grasp. They learn what they see. So, try to display things through your behavior first like closing doors & windows before leaving the house. Parents may even involve their offspring in these tasks as well.

Make your Kids learn the Emergency Numbers:

Tell your children about 911 and other emergency contact numbers, including your number and numbers of some trusted people. Guardians can even pen down these numbers and keep them besides land line phone. Also, making them learn the home address by heart can be pretty useful specifically in case they call 911 and they have to convey operator about it.

Install and Instruct about the Security Systems:

Positioning security systems like security alarms, security cameras, etc. will give you peace of mind when you are out. As children are mischievous, thus, they might end up doing some pranks or something naughty which you might not be happy about. And, to hide their activities they might deactivate the cameras for a while. So, instruct your kids strictly not to tamper with the security cameras. Also, share with them how to arm and disarm the alarm systems.

Unknown Parcels should not be accepted:

Kids should be guided not to accept any courier parcel which they don’t know about or for which their parents didn’t mention anything beforehand.

Eating Out With Kids

Consider their ages and stages. If your kids are school-aged and have been taught table manners, by all means, take them to a nice place. If your kids are still little and learning, please take them to a fast food place or teach them some manners at home! Emily Post has great advice. Kids should be taught to sit quietly and eat or participate in conversation, but not everyone is like me and has dinner around the table just about every night. I think children need opportunities to behave in a restaurant, but start small and slow before taking them someplace they’ll embarrass you or cause a scene.

Consider your purpose. Why are you planning to go to a restaurant? Is there some family event or are you just trying to avoid cooking dinner? Family gatherings can be fun, but make sure kids are included in the invite. (Here’s where a flexible caregiver can help!) If you just don’t want to cook, think frozen food, or at least choose a restaurant that is family-oriented, which leads to my second piece of advice.

Consider your options. So you’re going out. Where to take the family? Choose family – friendly as opposed to fancy when you’re taking the kids. Most chain restaurants are very family friendly, as are many locally-owned places. Please think about your fellow-diners when choosing where to take your children. If your kids will need toys and videos to occupy them while they wait, stay away from upscale places! If my husband and I are having a date night at a fancy place, we definitely don’t want to be interrupted by your cuties or have to listen to the latest kids’ movie either.

Must know about Kids And Respect

Being quiet in a library so that others can read.

Following your parents rules to show them that you care about them and how they feel about the situation.

Not hitting or calling people names because that could hurt them or hurt their feelings.

Dress, talk and act in a way that shows that you care about yourself and others.

Realize that everyone else looks, speaks, thinks and acts different and it is alright to show that you care about them and their feelings.

Standing up for the Pledge of Allegiance or bowing your head in prayer.

These are all simple ways for you to explain this to a child in a way that they can understand. Let’s all work on teaching our children what it means to treat others the way that you want to be treated. In our society today children are not motivated to do anything other than sit in front of a television, play video games, tweet or text on their phones. I remember as a child that we were outside ninety percent of the time playing and getting exercise. I think that we need to go back to those days when we didn’t have all of the technology that we have today. I know that children are learning a lot of their behavior from these other sources as well as not being taught. I think that if they are out in the community where they have to socialize with others and interact with everyone else in their community then they will be able to see that we are all different and that we can all help one another when it is needed. This will help them to learn how to treat others and to show some compassion as well as learn how they want others to treat them.

Info of Parental Homework Anxiety

Delegate. If you know that the daily routine of homework will inevitably end up with someone in tears, pass this job onto someone else. There is an Ancient Greek aphorism “know thyself”, which rings true in almost every facet of life, including parental homework anxiety. There is no shame in knowing your strengths as a parent, and the things that are just not your “cup of tea”. And, if homework brings about stress and chaos, delegate it out! Perhaps your partner can take on this task, or maybe an older sibling, a babysitter, or another family member can become the designated “Homework Helper”.

Multitask. I am well aware that it isn’t always feasible to delegate out the job of “Homework Helper”. In situations where the bulk of the job falls on your shoulders, and yours alone, find something else to do during homework time. At my oldest child’s first Back to School Night in kindergarten, I remember the teacher saying that homework is for the child to do, NOT THE PARENT. This seems pretty obvious. But, how often do we, as parents, get frustrated that our child doesn’t know all of the answers? Remember, homework is not supposed to be done perfectly. It helps the teacher to see how much the child has retained and where reinforcement might be needed. In fact, many elementary schools do not allow children to use erasers on their homework because teachers want to see what the children know, not what they have erased and then corrected. While this makes sense, how can we work this into an actual practice? So often, children sit down to do their homework and say “I need help”, before they even try to do the work on their own. We certainly can’t ignore their requests for help, can we? Well, why not make your child’s homework time the same time that you get something else done nearby? Perhaps your child aways does homework at the kitchen table, you can use that time to check email, write out bills, cook dinner- this way, you are in the same room as your child and you are available to help to clarify directions, but, it is clear that the homework is your child’s job, and you have a job to do, also.

You are not alone. Just browse Facebook for an hour, and you will see that this is a struggle for many parents. As with any anxiety provoking situation, in the midst of it, breathe. I am a big proponent of deep breathing. I find that inhaling over a count of four, holding it for a count of four and exhaling over a count of four, helps a great deal when you are starting to feel at your wit’s end. This may need to be repeated several times, depending on the level of frustration or anxiety that you feel. I also think it’s great when parents can support one another, so, reach out to friends and family. Who knows? Maybe a friend has a helpful technique that works for her. And, if nothing else, venting to someone close to you can help. When you choose to show your vulnerability and own your struggle, it opens the door to real connection. And, who cannot benefit from that?

Stop Praising

Students turn to cheating because they haven’t developed a strategy for handling failure. The problem is compounded when a parent ignores a child’s failures. Parents often continue to praise the intelligence and insists the kid will do better next time.

Michigan scholar Jennifer Crocker studies this exact scenario and explains that the child may come to believe failure is something so terrible; the family can’t acknowledge its existence. A child deprived of the opportunity to discuss mistakes can’t learn from them.

Cloninger has trained rats and mice in mazes to have persistence by carefully notrewarding them when they get to the finish. “The key is intermittent reinforcement,” says Cloninger. The brain has to learn that frustrating spells can be worked through. “A person who grows up getting too frequent rewards will not have persistence because they’ll quit when the rewards disappear.”

No, praise them differently! Recognize the effort, hard work and process. Let’s say every night your child (12-year-old boy) has math homework and is supposed to read a book aloud. Each takes about fifteen minutes if he concentrates, but he’s easily distracted. You should praise him for concentrating without asking to take a break. If he listens to instructions carefully, praise him for that. After soccer games, praise him for looking to pass, rather than just saying, “You played great.” And if he worked hard to get to the ball, raise the effort he applied.

Children Safe When Driving

When going from point “A” to point “B” with a child in a car the law requires that the minor 14 or under be in the back seat. Infant and toddlers, as per the law should be in a child’s car seat or a booster seat respectively. The infant’s car seat should be position where the back faces the passenger front seat, resulting in the infant facing the back seat cushion. Children six years or older use the booster seat and are secured by the car’s back seat belt. The restraint of the child in the car seat or the back seat has specifics layout to minimize injury should there be an accident.

Parents, when they follow these guidelines, drive around confident in the knowledge that their children are secured so that when an accident occurred the harm to them might be none or minimal. Parents who are not secure in this knowledge often reach out to community centers and designated stations to help them properly install the car seat. With the establishment of social media parents can also get information on the best way to buckle up their children via You Tube, Pinterest and yes even Twitter.

With so many resources available to families there are some parents who choice not to buckle up their children. Several times a year there are broadcasts on the importance of securing children when they are passengers in any vehicle. There are various videos on YouTube that show, with the use of dummies, what happens to children when the appropriate precautions are not in place. These simulated videos are very alarming. When you see the dummies fly from the back of the car to the front, or when the dummies in front of the car slams against the dashboard you cannot help but wonder why some parents do not buckle up their children.